What is rehab?

re·ha·bil·i·tate

verb \ˌrē-ə-ˈbi-lə-ˌtāt, ˌrē-hə-\

: to bring (someone or something) back to a normal, healthy condition after an illness, injury, drug problem, etc.

: to bring (someone or something) back to a good condition

Alcohol and drug rehabs do just that. The general purpose of an alcohol and drug rehab program is to facilitate long-term recovery and quality of life improvements for the individual and family dealing with a drug or alcohol problem, and the related difficulties that result. At Midwest Institute for Addiction we believe that beyond addressing the alcohol and drug problem there is a need to dig deeper and start to promote healing, lifestyle changes, and revelations that ultimately lead to an improved quality of life and happiness the individual and family may have not been able to obtain before. The difficulty for most individuals and families embarking on the journey of recovery from alcohol and drug problems is knowing exactly where to start and what kind of program is appropriate for their needs; often faced with the decision to enter a residential, inpatient, or outpatient alcohol and drug rehab center.

The general rule is that every individual should complete an outpatient program of some kind (intensive, regular, or aftercare services) upon leaving a residential or inpatient program. The research shows a very significant decrease in relapse rates for those who follow this rule. There are those too who do not have a need to enter a residential or inpatient program and can begin treatment in the outpatient program setting. Outpatient programs such as Midwest Institute for Addiction’s provide all the medical care, psychiatric care, and behavioral care that one would find in a residential or inpatient program, but on an outpatient basis that is compatible with work and life’s obligations. But there are those who have a medical need or lower motivation to change that require residential or inpatient stay. Some individuals simply want to “get away” for a short time and there is nothing wrong with this preference.

Understanding the differences can make the decision to enter an alcohol or drug rehab center much less stressful. Television and media often imprint the image of sending an individual to a long-term residential facility as the only solution for alcohol and drug addiction. There are many options and talking to your counselor, psychiatrist, or setting up an appointment with a facility can help you better understand your needs or the needs of a loved one. Learn more by setting up a free consultation with the professionals at Midwest Institute for Addiction today.